door installation questions

Prehung Door Sizes

Prehung Door Sizes

Prehung Door Sizes

Prehung Door Sizes. Determine door opening sizing and charts. When framing in the rough door opening, it’s important that you correctly frame the door opening to the correct size. Prehung Door sizes and rough opening sizes are very simple. All you really need to know about door sizes vs. rough openings are that rough openings are 2″ wider and 2.5″ taller than the door being installed. Note: do not take into account the door frame around the door. When it comes to the width and height of the door, only measure the door itself. The additional 2″ on the sides and 2.5″ on the top is so that if the framing is not perfect or the door frame, you will still have plenty of room for getting the door perfectly plumb and level.

Click Here for Video Instructions of Framing Rough Door Opening.

Examples:

1. If you have a 32″ wide rough door opening, you need to purchase a 30″ door.

2. If you purchased a door that is 2′-6″ wide then you need to frame a rough opening that is 2′-8″ wide.

You can get a custom door built to nearly any size, but the most typical doors carried at stores are standard at 2′-6″ and 3′. We recommend finding the door size you want before building the rough door opening.

 

 

 

 

Here is some additional information: http://www.ask.com/question/rough-opening-for-a-36-inch-pre-hung-door

Prehung Door Rough Opening

Prehung Door Rough Opening

Prehung Door Rough Opening

Prehung Door Rough Opening. Determine door opening sizing and charts. When framing in the rough door opening, it’s important that you correctly frame the door opening to the correct size. Door sizes and rough opening sizes are very simple. All you really need to know about door sizes vs. rough openings are that rough openings are 2″ wider and 2″ taller than the door being installed. Note: do not take into account the door frame around the door. When it comes to the width and height of the door, only measure the door itself. The additional 2″ on the sides and 2″ on the top is so that if the framing is not perfect or the door frame, you will still have plenty of room for getting the door perfectly plumb and level. Just remember that a rough door opening for a prehung door is always right around 2″ wider than the actual door, not including the frame/jamb around the door. For much more detailed video instructions of rough door openings for prehung doors, click the link below and see that actual building of a rough door opening.

 

Click Here for Video Instructions of Framing Rough Door Opening.

 

 

Examples:

1. If you have a 32″ wide rough door opening, you need to purchase a 30″ door.

2. If you purchased a door that is 2′-6″ wide then you need to frame a rough opening that is 2′-8″ wide.

You can get a custom door built to nearly any size, but the most typical doors carried at stores are standard at 2′-6″ and 3′. We recommend finding the door size you want before building the rough door opening.

For more information on other sites, click here.

 

prehung door rough opening

Reinforcing Large Heavy Doors

Reinforcing Large Heavy Doors

If the door being installed is Very Heavy and/or Very Large, you may want to consider one or more of these additional installation steps for added support. Reinforcing large heavy doors

1. Install 3 Long Hinge Screws (Pro Builder Preferred Method)
Remove the center screw from each of the hinges where they attach to the door jamb/frame. These screws are usually only 1/2″ long. Replace these 3 short hinge screws with longer screws that will reach all the way into the wall stud (about 2″ or longer). The Quick Door Hanger brackets have a clearance hole for the screw to go through if the brackets where placed directly behind the hinges. This will greatly increase the strength of the door installation. NOTE: Make sure when screwing in the 3 long screws that you do not tighten to much or it will begin to pull the door jamb in toward the wall. To prevent this pulling in of the jamb, you can place shims or a piece of wood between the door jamb and the wall stud where the screw will go through. These longer screws can be purchase in the screw aisle of your local store (usually in packs of 2 0r 3 screws). For consistency, try to purchase screws with the same finish (color) as your old screws.

AND/OR

2. Use additional Quick Door Hanger Brackets
When installing very large doors, additional brackets are often used by builders. The addition of an extra pack of brackets will add the additional support that is often needed during the installation of very tall doors. 8′ or greater doors usually will have a 4th hinge instead of simply 3. On these tall doors, you will want to add a door installation bracket behind this 4th hinge as well as the other 3. On very wide doors, such as an entry door with a sidelight or a double or French door, extra brackets should be used along the top of the door to properly secure it in place.

AND/OR

3. Shimming Doors
If the door being installed is a very large or is a very heavy door, reinforcement may be desired. If it is desired to reinforce the door with shims, shim the top of the door, shim just above or below the latch stop, and shim as close as possible to the hinges. NOTE: If you decide to install shims, you will need to nail through the door jamb, through the shims, and into the wall stud using finishing nails. You will then need to patch the nail holes.

Unusually Large Door Opening | Rough Opening too Wide

Unusually Large Door Opening | Rough Opening too Wide

Unusually Large Door Opening | Rough Opening too Wide

unusually large door opening

Unusually large door opening. Typically the rough door opening should be about 2 inches wider than the door you are installing (just the door, don’t include door frame in this measurement). If you place your pre-hung door and frame into the center of the opening, there should be roughly 1″of total play or 1/2″ on each side between the door frame and the rough opening. This 1″ of total play will allow you to properly adjust the door for plumb and level. Max gap between rough opening and door frame is 3/4″ per side, any larger of a gap and the door installation brackets (available at Home Depot) will not reach far enough to secure to the wall. If your unusual size gap is more than 3.5″ larger than your door (not including frame) then you will need to do either 1 of these 2 things:


1. Only use 3 of the 6 door installation brackets. Screw a bracket behind each hinge. Don’t install the other 3 brackets. Install the door only using the 3 hinge side brackets based on your drawn level line. This will install the door plumb and level. Then, use shims to finish the other side of the door to close up the unusually large door opening. Using the brackets on the hinge side will take the hard work out of the installation shimming and plumbing process. All you will need to do is shim the other side based on the reveal (gap between door and door frame). You will be able to shim the unusually large gap.

Or

2. Screw a 1″x4″ board to your rough opening that extends from the floor to the top of the rough opening in order to close the gap to a manageable size.

Here is some more information on the web, Click Here.

Customer Quote

Extra Large Rough Opening!

Extra Large Rough Opening!

Thanks for the help. I only had one door that needed modification. The others were within the 2” margin. It was every bit as easy as your promotional material suggests. Thanks for a great product!

Rick W.

Door Sizing Charts for Rough Opening

Door Sizing Charts for Rough Opening

Door Sizing Charts

Door Sizing Charts. When framing in the rough door opening, it’s important that you correctly frame the opening to the correct size. Door sizes and rough opening sizes are very simple. All you really need to know about door sizes vs. rough openings are that rough openings are 2″ wider and 2.5″ taller than the door being installed. Note: do not take into account the door frame around the door. When it comes to the width and height of the door, only measure the door itself. The additional 2″ on the sides and 2.5″ on the top is so that if the framing is not perfect or the door frame, you will still have plenty of room for getting the door perfectly plumb and level. Often times door sizes can also be written in this manner: 2/6 or 3/0. This simply means 2’6″ and 3’0″.

Click Here for Video of Framing a Rough Door Opening

Examples:

1. If you have a 32″ wide rough door opening, you need to purchase a 30″ door.

2. If you purchased a door that is 2′-6″ wide then you need to frame a rough opening that is 2′-8″ wide.

You can get a custom door built to nearly any size, but the most typical doors carried at improvement stores are standard at 2′-0″ through 3′. We recommend finding the door size you want before building the rough door opening. Also, don’t forget to grab a package of The Quick Door Hanger kit. Available at nearly all Home Depot locations for the same price as a pack of shims. The kit contains brackets and screws for installing a prehung door in minutes without the hard work of shimming.

door sizing charts prehung

More information can be seen at: Click Here

Steel Wall Studs Door Installation

Steel Wall Studs Door Installation

Steel Wall Studs Door Installation

Installing a door onto a wall made of steel studs. The following instructions use the Quick Door Hanger kit that is available at nearly all Home Depot locations in the interior door aisle. Simply watch this installation video below. These instructions are for installing a pre-hung door with a wood jamb/frame. They will not work with a steel door frame.

 Click Here for Installation Video

You will need to purchase 6 Screws that are NOT included with the door installation kit.
The quick door hanger works great even when installing a door onto steel wall studs. The only thing that is different when installing onto metal studs is that you will not be able to use the 6 black screws that are supplied with the brackets. To start, you will need to have the drywall already installed onto the studs. Do everything as normal with the door installation brackets, however you will need to use 6 steel screws for specifically screwing into the steel studs instead of using the supplied drywall screws.

For more information on the web, Click Here.

Common Door Terms Diagram

Common Door Terms Diagram

Common Door Terms Diagram

Common Door Terms Diagram. See the diagram for common door terms, components and terminology for rough door openings as well as doors. Whether you are a trade professional, an experienced do-it-yourselfer, or just learning about doors, sometimes you encounter a term that needs more definition or clarity. So, just in case, we’ve provided this Glossary of commonly used terms associated with the door category. This should help you with the information required to better understand and complete your home improvement project

Common Door Terms Diagram

Rough Door Opening

The framed in section of the wall the door will be mounted in.

Wall top plate– top 2×4 that runs the length of the wall and the 2×4 studs are attached to.

Wall sole plate– bottom 2×4 that runs the length of the wall and the 2×4 studs are attached to (treated if on cement).

King stud– vertical 2×4 on the outsides of the rough door opening.

Jack stud– vertical 2×4 attached to king stud and support the header.

Cripple stud– vertical 2x4s that keep wall stud spacing and transfer support from wall top plate to the header.

Header– horizontal board usally 2×6 or larger that spans from top of jack stud to other. Transfers cripple stud support to jack studs.

Door

Casing(trim)– the molding that surrounds the door frame for looks

Sill– bottom of door

Jamb– the door frame that surronds the actual door. Attached to door by hinges.

Stop– small strip of wood that surrounds the entire inside perimeter of the door and stops the door from swinging in to far.

Hinges– attach the door to the door jamb (frame).

Top rail– top portion of the door.

Bottom rail– bottom portion of the door.

Lock rail– middel horizontal portion of door usually same level as the door knob.

Panels– usaually rectangles on front and back face of door for looks.

Mullion– verticle center of door.

Lock stile– leading edge of the door.

More information on door terminology can be found by Clicking Here.

Removing Old Door

Removing Old Door

Removing Old Door

The following instructions are for the removing old door and door jamb. Follow this step-by-step guide for proper door replacement.

removing old door

Step 1:

Remove the Door Pins

Using a hammer and a flat head screw driver or chisel, tap at the joint where the head of the pin and the top edge of the hinge meet. Tap the ping upward until it pops out. Do this on all the hinges, usually 2 to 4 of them. You may want to shim between the bottom of the door and the floor. Placing something under the door will take pressure off the hinge pins and will make them easier to remove.


Step 2:

Lift the Door off the Hinges

Using both hands, lift the door out of the hinges removing old door. Hint: make sure the door does not tip and whack you in the head (know from personal experience). Now, this is where you have to either choose to patch and repair the door or discard it.

 


Step 3:

Remove the Casing (Trim) from around the Door Frame

Using the claw side of a hammer, pry up the old trim from both the front and back sides of the door and discard. The trim is simply finish nailed on and should come up fairly easy. Be careful to not damage the drywall when prying up the trim. Otherwise, you will need to patch and repair the drywall before installing the new door.

 


Step 4:

Remove the Door Jamb (Frame)

Now that the trim has been removed, looking between the door jamb (door frame) and the wall, you will see the shims. Using a hacksaw or a sawzall (preferred) cut through the nails where the shims meet the wall stud. There will usually be around 6 locations that you will need to cut through. The door jamb (frame) can now be removed and discarded. That’s it!

Click Here for more information on removing old doors.

Floor Not Level, Unlevel/Uneven Floor Door Installation

Floor Not Level, Unlevel/Uneven Floor Door Installation

Floor Not Level, Unlevel/Uneven Floor Door Installation

Question:

I’m setting a pre-hung interior wood door on an existing concrete slab in a basement. The slab is all over the place and floor not level. Other than leveling the slab, which isn’t an option, what is the best way to set the door so the head is level, cut the jamb on the high end or shim it on the low end? Haven’t taken a measurement yet, but could be a difference in elevation of 1/2″. I have 1 1/2″ clearance from the BO door to the BO jambs. Haven’t checked the clearance on the swing yet, but should be there if I only cut off 1/2″ from the jamb.

If the finished floor is already installed:

Floor not level? If the finished floor is already installed, the jamb legs may need to be cut to achieve the correct reveal around the door. Using a level and a shim, figure out if there is a difference in height across the width of the opening. If the floor is level, trim the jam so that the door will clear the finished floor by about 1/2″. If the floor is out of level, trim that much more off the jamb on the high side.

More information can be seen by Clicking Here.

Door Corner Sticks Out | Door Out of Plane

Door Corner Sticks Out | Door Out of Plane

Help – Part of the Door Corner Sticks Out and is Not Tight Against Stop

Door Corner Sticks Out. I recently installed my door. Using a level everything checks out good, but when I installed the door and it is in the closed position, the top corner opposite the hinges, sticks out away from the jamb/door frame and is not tight against the door stop. I also noticed the gap on the hinge side is different. Seems as though the door is twisted?? What is the reason for this, and are there specific instructions on how to install a door with the problem of a not so perfect opening?

door corner sticks out not tight against stop

 


ANSWER:

This is common. A common term for when a door corner sticks out is your door is out of plane. The fix to this problem of a door corner sticks out is completed by trial and error.

Your door jamb needs to be in the same plane for it to close properly. In other words the wall the door is being hung on is probably not completely flat “slightly twisted”. Let’s say the top corner opposite the hinges sticks out away from the jamb. What you will need to do is move the bottom of the door jamb/frame of the hinge side out in the same direction as the door is sticking out. This will bring the door into plane. This is accomplished by slightly bending the door installation brackets. With the door in the closed position and with the trim/casing removed, slightly hammer the door jamb/frame in the proper direction. Use a block of wood between the hammer and the jamb to prevent damaging. Open and close the door to check that the door is tight against the door stop, should be about flush all the way from the bottom of the door to the top.

Sometimes, depending on the wall, you may need to move all 4 corners of the door (you can move the corners IN and OUT of the wall). You should split the difference by moving multiple corners. When you are done, you can place the door casing/trim directly over the brackets to cover up the movements (should not be noticeable after the door trim/casing is installed). Your door will now be perfectly in plane, even though your wall is not and the imperfections will be hidden by the door trim/casing. If done correctly, the result will be a very strong, sturdy, professional door installation.

More information can be found by Clicking Here.

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