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Prehung Door Sizes

Prehung Door Sizes

Prehung Door Sizes

Prehung Door Sizes. Determine door opening sizing and charts. When framing in the rough door opening, it’s important that you correctly frame the door opening to the correct size. Prehung Door sizes and rough opening sizes are very simple. All you really need to know about door sizes vs. rough openings are that rough openings are 2″ wider and 2.5″ taller than the door being installed. Note: do not take into account the door frame around the door. When it comes to the width and height of the door, only measure the door itself. The additional 2″ on the sides and 2.5″ on the top is so that if the framing is not perfect or the door frame, you will still have plenty of room for getting the door perfectly plumb and level.

Click Here for Video Instructions of Framing Rough Door Opening.

Examples:

1. If you have a 32″ wide rough door opening, you need to purchase a 30″ door.

2. If you purchased a door that is 2′-6″ wide then you need to frame a rough opening that is 2′-8″ wide.

You can get a custom door built to nearly any size, but the most typical doors carried at stores are standard at 2′-6″ and 3′. We recommend finding the door size you want before building the rough door opening.

 

 

 

 

Here is some additional information: http://www.ask.com/question/rough-opening-for-a-36-inch-pre-hung-door

Prehung Door Rough Opening

Prehung Door Rough Opening

Prehung Door Rough Opening

Prehung Door Rough Opening. Determine door opening sizing and charts. When framing in the rough door opening, it’s important that you correctly frame the door opening to the correct size. Door sizes and rough opening sizes are very simple. All you really need to know about door sizes vs. rough openings are that rough openings are 2″ wider and 2″ taller than the door being installed. Note: do not take into account the door frame around the door. When it comes to the width and height of the door, only measure the door itself. The additional 2″ on the sides and 2″ on the top is so that if the framing is not perfect or the door frame, you will still have plenty of room for getting the door perfectly plumb and level. Just remember that a rough door opening for a prehung door is always right around 2″ wider than the actual door, not including the frame/jamb around the door. For much more detailed video instructions of rough door openings for prehung doors, click the link below and see that actual building of a rough door opening.

 

Click Here for Video Instructions of Framing Rough Door Opening.

 

 

Examples:

1. If you have a 32″ wide rough door opening, you need to purchase a 30″ door.

2. If you purchased a door that is 2′-6″ wide then you need to frame a rough opening that is 2′-8″ wide.

You can get a custom door built to nearly any size, but the most typical doors carried at stores are standard at 2′-6″ and 3′. We recommend finding the door size you want before building the rough door opening.

For more information on other sites, click here.

 

prehung door rough opening

Preparing Window Opening

Preparing Window Opening

Making sure that a rough window opening is properly prepared and the window installation is properly sealed is the single most important step of any window installation. See instructions on how to properly prepare a rough window opening for window installation. See how to care for building wrap, how to prepare and place window flashing, and how to caulk and tape seal the window for a perfect weatherproof window installation.

Video Coming Soon...

Building Wrap

If building wrap has just been applied to the building, cut the wrap flush with top, bottom and sides of the rough window opening. If replacing a window, be careful to not damage the old building wrap, if damaged, replace by reapplying from the bottom up in a shingle like layered fashion well overlapping. What you're doing by this is making sure that if water runs down it, it will stay on the outside and not go behind the next layer.

On the top of the rough window opening, make a 3 inch cut on each of the 2 corners on a 45 degree angle away from the opening, then fold up and secure with tape (the tap is to temporarily keep the flap out of the way). 

Cut the Flashing

Working with a roll of 6' wide self-adhesive window/door flashing, cut to length. Measure the rough window opening width. Cut the flashing to this dimension plus 6'. Cut a slit 3' in from each side of the flashing.

Place the Flashing

Pull the adhesive covering wrap off the back of the flashing and place the flashing into the rough opening as shown. Take care so that it does not wrinkle or fold back onto itself. Take your time and make sure that it's perfect, this will help keep the window sealed.

Caulk the Opening

Using window/door exterior sealing caulk, caulk a bead around the entire window perimeter 1/2' - 3/4' from the opening.

Tape the Window

After the window has been installed, use window sealing tape to seal the window (also known as building wrap tape). Start on the bottom and place the tape over the entire nailing flange/fin and overlap it onto the house wrap. Then tape the window sides the same way, overlapping onto the tape that was just applied on the bottom of the window. Then apply tap to the top of the window, overlapping onto the side tape. Make sure that the tape does not wrinkle or fold back onto itself. Take your time and make sure that it's perfect, this is the single most important step for keeping the window perfectly sealed from the elements. 

Finish the Building Wrap and Corners

Release the building wrap that was folded up in step 1 and let it cover the wrap tape that was just applied. Secure the wrap to the tape by placing a bead of caulk under the wrap, and then tape the ends with the building wrap tape. Finish the sealing process by applying caulk to the top corners of the window with a 1/4' bead of sealant.

Window Installation Instructions

Click the Button to Return to the Window Installation Instructions!

View Instructions

Installing Just a Slab Door (Not a New Frame)

Installing Just a Slab Door

View this video for the installation of a new slab door onto an old door jamb. This will be slightly harder than replacing the old door jamb with a new pre-hung door, but this is often the only way to get the best looking doors. You may want to consider using a router instead of a chisel for the hinge locations like the video shows.

Reinforcing Large Heavy Doors

Reinforcing Large Heavy Doors

If the door being installed is Very Heavy and/or Very Large, you may want to consider one or more of these additional installation steps for added support. Reinforcing large heavy doors

1. Install 3 Long Hinge Screws (Pro Builder Preferred Method)
Remove the center screw from each of the hinges where they attach to the door jamb/frame. These screws are usually only 1/2″ long. Replace these 3 short hinge screws with longer screws that will reach all the way into the wall stud (about 2″ or longer). The Quick Door Hanger brackets have a clearance hole for the screw to go through if the brackets where placed directly behind the hinges. This will greatly increase the strength of the door installation. NOTE: Make sure when screwing in the 3 long screws that you do not tighten to much or it will begin to pull the door jamb in toward the wall. To prevent this pulling in of the jamb, you can place shims or a piece of wood between the door jamb and the wall stud where the screw will go through. These longer screws can be purchase in the screw aisle of your local store (usually in packs of 2 0r 3 screws). For consistency, try to purchase screws with the same finish (color) as your old screws.

AND/OR

2. Use additional Quick Door Hanger Brackets
When installing very large doors, additional brackets are often used by builders. The addition of an extra pack of brackets will add the additional support that is often needed during the installation of very tall doors. 8′ or greater doors usually will have a 4th hinge instead of simply 3. On these tall doors, you will want to add a door installation bracket behind this 4th hinge as well as the other 3. On very wide doors, such as an entry door with a sidelight or a double or French door, extra brackets should be used along the top of the door to properly secure it in place.

AND/OR

3. Shimming Doors
If the door being installed is a very large or is a very heavy door, reinforcement may be desired. If it is desired to reinforce the door with shims, shim the top of the door, shim just above or below the latch stop, and shim as close as possible to the hinges. NOTE: If you decide to install shims, you will need to nail through the door jamb, through the shims, and into the wall stud using finishing nails. You will then need to patch the nail holes.

Cutting Baseboard Outside Corner

Cutting Baseboard Outside Corners

Cutting baseboard outside corner. See video how to cut perfect baseboard outside corners. Match up corners perfectly for very sharp clean looking trim.

It should be easy, right? Just measure the boards, cut the miters, and nail the trim in place. Well, not exactly.

If you’ve ever tried to install baseboard on your own, then you would probably agree that looks can be deceiving. All too often a DIY baseboard installation is compromised by gaps or ill-fitting joints, resulting from walls that aren’t flat, floors that aren’t level, or corners that aren’t square.

Inside corners can be especially tricky to pull off. For a tight fit, use a coped joint. A mitered corner might be ideal for an outside corner, but an inside corner joint will be better formed if you cope the profile of one baseboard to fit snugly against the contours of its mate. -BobVila.com 

cutting baseboard outside corner

More information can be seen on the web at: Click Here

Baseboard Inside Corner

Baseboard Inside Corner

See how to cut perfect baseboard inside corners. Match up corners perfectly for very sharp clean looking trim. When you lay baseboard against a wall and see gaps between the top of the trim and the drywall, it’s usually because of a misaligned stud or a built-up ridge of taping compound over a joint. Both will create bulges that cause gaps. You’ll also find the problem at outside and inside corners, again caused by built-up taping compound. While you can scrape off small lumps with a putty knife, you can’t move studs or sand off the bulge of compound without creating a huge mess. It’s almost always easier to adjust the trim rather than to attempt any wall fixes. Bob from Home Remodel Workshop will guide you through the process of cutting baseboard inside corners in this how to video above.

baseboard inside corner cutting

Here is some more information on the web: Click Here

Touching Up Trim

Touching Up Trim

Instructions for how to prepare stained trim for installation and touch-up. After stained trim or door casing has been installed, see how to properly touch-up the wood for a perfect looking finish. If the stain was applied over a finish like varnish or polyurethane, the stain is sitting on top of the finish, and is not penetrating to the wood. To refinish anything “perfectly” you first have to remove the existing finish, and that can really only be done by chemically stripping the old finish from the wood so that you can get down to bare wood. After the old finish has been removed and the stripper residue has been cleaned off the surface of the wood, the wood would then have to be completely sanded.

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/painting-both-interior-exterior-surfaces/485220-best-way-touch-up-stained-wood.html#ixzz2sxAmT7fi

touching up trim

More information at http://mattandshari.com/how-to/paint-and-paper/how-to-touch-up-painted-and-stained-woodwork/

Patching Nail Holes

Patching Nail Holes

Learn tips for patching nail holes in trim and how to caulk your wood trim molding before painting. Give your doors a professional look by fixing holes and cracks in your door casing and door jamb. See how to fix door jamb nail holes. Patching helps to strengthen surfaces that have been damaged due to repeated nailing or hammering. There are basically two approaches for patching nail-holes in moldings, patching with caulk and patching with wood-fillers. The patching process is essentially the same in both the approaches. The major difference between the two approaches lies in the kind of patching material used. Bob will guide you through the process in the video above.

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/stry/how-to-patch-a-nail-hole-in-moulding#.UvkxLFqPKUk

patching nail holes

Unusually Large Door Opening | Rough Opening too Wide

Unusually Large Door Opening | Rough Opening too Wide

Unusually Large Door Opening | Rough Opening too Wide

unusually large door opening

Unusually large door opening. Typically the rough door opening should be about 2 inches wider than the door you are installing (just the door, don’t include door frame in this measurement). If you place your pre-hung door and frame into the center of the opening, there should be roughly 1″of total play or 1/2″ on each side between the door frame and the rough opening. This 1″ of total play will allow you to properly adjust the door for plumb and level. Max gap between rough opening and door frame is 3/4″ per side, any larger of a gap and the door installation brackets (available at Home Depot) will not reach far enough to secure to the wall. If your unusual size gap is more than 3.5″ larger than your door (not including frame) then you will need to do either 1 of these 2 things:


1. Only use 3 of the 6 door installation brackets. Screw a bracket behind each hinge. Don’t install the other 3 brackets. Install the door only using the 3 hinge side brackets based on your drawn level line. This will install the door plumb and level. Then, use shims to finish the other side of the door to close up the unusually large door opening. Using the brackets on the hinge side will take the hard work out of the installation shimming and plumbing process. All you will need to do is shim the other side based on the reveal (gap between door and door frame). You will be able to shim the unusually large gap.

Or

2. Screw a 1″x4″ board to your rough opening that extends from the floor to the top of the rough opening in order to close the gap to a manageable size.

Here is some more information on the web, Click Here.

Customer Quote

Extra Large Rough Opening!

Extra Large Rough Opening!

Thanks for the help. I only had one door that needed modification. The others were within the 2” margin. It was every bit as easy as your promotional material suggests. Thanks for a great product!

Rick W.

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